Gears Trains

 

Gears Trains

A gear train is two or more gear working together by meshing their teeth and turning each other in a system to generate power and speed. It reduces speed and increases torque. To create large gear ratio, gears are connected together to form gear trains. They often consist of multiple gears in the train.The most common of the gear train is the gear pair connecting parallel shafts. The teeth of this type can be spur, helical or herringbone. The angular velocity is simply the reverse of the tooth ratio.Any combination of gear wheels employed to transmit motion from one shaft to the other is called a gear train. The meshing of two gears may be idealized as two smooth discs with their edges touching and no slip between them. This ideal diameter is called the Pitch Circle Diameter (PCD) of the gear.

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Simple Gear Trains

The typical spur gears as shown in diagram. The direction of rotation is reversed from one gear to another. It has no affect on the gear ratio. The teeth on the gears must all be the same size so if gear A advances one tooth, so does B and C.

Simple Gear Trains

The typical spur gears as shown in diagram. The direction of rotation is reversed from one gear to another. It has no affect on the gear ratio. The teeth on the gears must all be the same size so if gear A advances one tooth, so does B and C.

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Compound Gear train

Compound gears are simply a chain of simple gear trains with the input of the second being the output of the first. A chain of two pairs is shown below. Gear B is the output of the first pair and gear C is the input of the second pair. Compound Gear train

Gears B and C are locked to the same shaft and revolve at the same speed.

For large velocities ratios, compound gear train arrangement is preferred.

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Reverted Gear train

Is a compound gear train in which the driver and driven gears are coaxial.. These are used in speed reducers, clocks and machine tools.

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Epicyclic gear train:

Epicyclic means one gear revolving upon and around another. The design involves planet and sun gears as one orbits the other like a planet around the sun. Here is a picture of a typical gear

box.

This design can produce large gear ratios in a small space and are used on a wide range of applications from marine gearboxes to electric screwdrivers.

Basic Theory

The diagram shows a gear B on the end of an arm. Gear B meshes with gear C and revolves around it when the arm is rotated. B is called the planet gear and C the sun.

First consider what happens when the planet gear orbits the sun gear.

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Observe point p and you will see that gear B also revolves once on its own axis. Any object orbiting around a center must rotate once. Now consider that B is free to rotate on its shaft and meshes with C.

Suppose the arm is held stationary and gear C is rotated once. B spins about its own center and the number of revolutions it makes is the ratio tC/tB. B will rotate by this number for every complete revolution of C.

Now consider that C is unable to rotate and the arm A is revolved once. Gear B will revolve 1+ tC/tB because of the orbit. It is this extra rotation that causes confusion. One way to get round this is to imagine that the whole system is revolved once. Then identify the gear that is fixed and revolve it back one revolution. Work out the revolutions of the other gears and add them up. The following tabular method makes it easy.

Suppose gear C is fixed and the arm A makes one revolution. Determine how many revolutions the planet gear B makes.

Step 1 is to revolve everything once about the center.

Step 2 identify that C should be fixed and rotate it backwards one revolution keeping the arm fixed as

it should only do one revolution in total. Work out the revolutions of B.

Step 3 is simply add them up and we find the total revs of C is zero and for the arm is 1.

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The number of revolutions made by B is (1+ tC/tB ) Note that if C revolves -1, then the direction of B is opposite so + tC/tB .

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